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Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

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The Oath of Hippocrates 



I SWEAR by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, & Hygeia, and 
Panacea, and all the gods and goddesses, that according to my ability 
and judgment I will keep this oath and this stipulation: to reckon him 
who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my 
substance with him and relieve his necessities if required; to look upon 
his offspring as my own brothers and to teach them this Art, if they shall 
wish to learn it. without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, 
and every other mode of instruction I will impart a knowledge of the Art 
to my own sons and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a 
stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but to none others. 
I will follow that system of regimen which according to my ability and 
judgment I consider for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from what- 
ever is deleterious and mischievous. I will give no deadly medicine to 
anyone if asked, nor suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will 
not give to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with 
holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut persons 
laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be done by men who are 
practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I enter I will go into 
llieni for the benefit of the sick and will abstain from every voluntary act 
of mischief and corruption; & further, from the seduction of females or 
males, o( freemen and slaves. Whatever, in connection with my profes- 
sional practice or not in connection with it, I see or hear in the life of men 
which ought nol l" be spoken of abroad. I will mil divulge, as reckoning 
that all such should be kept secret. While I continue to keep this oath 
uuviolated may il be granted to me to enjoy life and the practice of the 
Art, respected by all men & all times. Cut should I trespass and violate 
this oath may the reverse be my lot. 



THE COLLEGE 
OF PHYSICIANS 
AND SURGEONS 



1961 



EDITOR 
JOHN A 
TALBOTT 



To Aura E. Severinghaus 




To Aura E. Severinghaus, who imparted to the Office of the Dean 
a friendly warmth and concern for all students throughout their four 
years. His presence, which has been felt for so many years, will be 
missed. 




To David See gal 



To David Seegal— teacher, philosopher, clinician. A strong man 
who increased his stature by admitting when he did not know. 
Through his infectious enthusiasm he imparted to all who came into 
contact with him his own marvellous love of learning medicine. It has 
been a privilege to be affected by his honesty, warmth and genius. 



The Yearbook Staff 



John. A. Talbott Editor 

Robert W. Kalinske Business Manager 

Advertising Staff— Temby Argall, Peter Banks, William Fleming, 
James Gale, Al Janoski, Leonard Katz, Helen Redman. 

Caption Editors— Stuart Billig, Henry Bowers, Howard Corning, 
Seth Harvey, John Robinson. 

Faculty Pictures— John Talbott. 

Photo Credits— Stanley Cohen, Jim Kim, Robert Kalinske. 

Acknowledgements— H. G. Roebuck and Son (Printers), Harry 
Gilbert (Photographer), Public Information and Elizabeth 
Wilcox, Edwin M. Barton, William Bowers, Joshua Hollen- 
der, William A. Horowitz, Fielding Jost Michelson, Shih- 
Chuh Wang. 



Senior Portraits 



of the Class of 1961 



The College of 
Physicians and Surgeons 



Columbia University 





Charles DeBertram Allen 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

279 Main Street 

Sanford, Me. 



Frederic Augustus Ailing 

A. B., Princeton, 1952 
53 Melrose Place 
Montclair, N. J. 



Temby Richie Argall 

A. B., Yale, 1957 
Lakeville, Conn. 




Peter Alan Banks 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

15 Rangeley Road 

Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 





David Sayre Bard 

B. S., Stefson, 1957 
4614 Seagrape Drive 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 




Griffin Miller Bates, Jr. 

A. B., Hamilton, 1957 
148-11 88th Ave. 
Jamaica 35, N. Y. 




HeberW. Becker, Jr. 

6. S., Franklin & Marshall, 1957 

321 West Chestnut St. 

Lancaster, Penna. 




Daryl Elizabeth Beckman 

A. 8., Mount Holyoke, 1957 

1520 Spruce St. 

Philadelphia, Penna. 




Burton I. Benjamin 

A. 8., Hamilton, 1957 

67-38 108th St. 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 




Stuart Lawrence Billig 

A. B., Hamilton, 1957 
1 Park Terrace East 
New York 34, N. Y. 




Edward Thomas Bowe 

8. S., Columbia, 1957 

c/o Hurley 

655 Boulevard 

New Milford, N. J. 






Charles Beauford Brill 

A. B., Lafayette, 1957 

720 Ft. Washington Ave. 

New York 40, N. Y. 




George A. Bullwinkel, Jr. 

A. B., Yale, 7957 

125 Milton Rd. 

Rye, N. Y. 



Carl Frederick Brunjes 

A. B., Yale, 1957 
26 Lakeview Ave. 
Hartsdale, N. Y. 





A. Barry Campbell 

A. B., Princeton, J 957 

3029 Fairmouru Blvd. 

Cleveland Heights 18, Ohio 



Patricia A. Campbell 

A.B., Vassar, 7956 

37 Kingsley Dr. 

Bronxville Heights 

Yonkers, N. Y. 





Hugh Clark 

A. 8., Williams, 1957 

Box 184 

Oldwick, N. J. 



Edward Warren Christensen 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 

32 West 76th St. 
New York 23, N. Y. 







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10 







Martin Noel Cohen 

A. 8., Harvard, 1957 
2 Barry Place 

Passaic, N. J. 



Joseph Henry Clevenger, Jr. 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 

3124 University Ave. 

Muncie, Ind. 





Stanley Cohen 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 
175 East 52nd St. 
Brooklyn 3, N. Y. 



Lawrence Jerome Cohn 

8. S., Franklin & Marshall, 1957 
1206 East 22nd St. 
Brooklyn 10, N. Y. 





Howard B. Corning 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

Laurel Hollow 

Syosset, N. Y. 



Carroll Cross 

A. B., Pomona, 1957 

4117 43rd Ave. NE 

Seattle 5, Wash. 




11 



John P. Curran 

A. 8., St. Mary's, 1957 

563 Bidwell St. 

St. Paul 7, Minn. 






Peter Emanuel Dans 

8. S., Manhattan, 1957 

6029 Delafield Ave. 

New York, N. Y. 



William Hoyr Danrzler 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 
2415 N. Wilson Dr. 
Milwaukee 11, Wis. 



^^^1 

"^ 



■V 



Norman Decker 

A. 8., Columbia, 1957 

3477 Corsa Ave. 
New York 69, N. Y. 



Allen Johnson Dennis, Jr. 

A. B., Rice, 1957 

1825 Hardeman Ave. 

Macon, Ga. 




Ruthmary Knebel Deuel 

A. B., Ml. Holyoke, 1956 

Box 11 

Canaan, N. Y. 




12 



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Thomas Franklin Deuel 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 
14 Hawthorne Rd. 
Short Hills, N. J. 





Robert James DeWitt 

A. 8., Carleton, 1957 
567 Main St. 
Osconto, Wis. 



mh 



Joel L. Duberstein 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 
707 Ave. C 

Bayonne, N. J. 



William Y. Duncan III 
B.S.,Yo7e, 1953 
62 Cleveland Rd. 
New Haven 15, Conn. 




Lawrence J. Durante 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 

35-1 1 Crescent St. 

Long Island City 6, N. Y. 






>^ 




V/ 



Edward M. Dwyer 

A.B., Columbia, 1957 
238 Phelps Ave. 
Cresskill, N. J. 



13 




Edward Stanley Emery III 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 

231 Randolph Ave. 

Milton, Mass. 



Jerry B. Finkel 
A. B., Columbia, 7957 

815 Gerard Ave. 
New York 51, N. Y. 




William Hare Fleming 

A. B., Yale, 1957 

2125 Chesire Rd. 

Columbus 21, Ohio 





James L. Gale 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

Barretts Mill Rd. 

Concord, Mass. 




^ ^S 






Richard Alan Gilman 

A. B., Williams, 1957 

15 Orchard Rd. 
Swampscott, Mass. 



Joel Ginsberg 

A. B., Princeton, 1956 
978 East 24th St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



14 



Joseph L. Glass 

A. 8., Princeton, 1957 
76 Tilrose Ave. 
Malverne, N. Y. 




v ■» 




Samuel Gerald Golden 

A. 8., Princeton, 1957 

109 Weequahie Ave. 

Newark, N. J. 








Paul A. Graham 

A. 8., Princeton, 1956 

21 Warwood Terrace 

Wheeling, W. Va. 






Raymond Frederick Gregory 


Lionel Grossbard 


A. 8., Princeton, 7957 


A. 8., Columbia, 1957 


3111 Ave. O 
Galveston, Tex. 


514 Montgomery St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Frederick Maurice Grossman 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

730 E. Kerbey Ave. 

El Paso, Tex. 




■v 




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15 






Frederick G. Guggenheim 


Paul P. Gwyn, Jr. 


Seth Harvey 


A. B., Yale, 1957 


A. B., Princeton, 1957 


A. 8., Princeton, 1955 


3018 R. St. NW 


Box 33 


168 East 95th St. 


Washington, D. C. 


West Jefferson, N. C. 


New York, N. Y. 



Ed Jerald Hendricks 


Peter Blanchard Hope 


Alfonso Hubert Janoski 


A. B., Rice, 7957 


A. B., Harvard, 1957 


A.B., Seton Hall, 1957 


8014 Buffalo Speedway 
Houston 25, Tex. 


15 Claremont Ave. 
New York 27, N. Y. 


294 Ampere Pkwy. 
Bloomfield, N. J. 






16 




I 








Robert Wayne Kalinske 


Edward Lyle Katz 


Leonard Allen Katz 


A. B., Yale, 1957 


A. B., Princeton, 1957 


A. B., Yale, 1957 


2715 Devon Drive 


140 Fern St. 


1 14 Homer Ave. 


Tucson, Ariz. 


Hartford, Conn. 


Buffalo 16, N.Y. 



Peter Francis Kohler 


Leonard David Kohn 


Joel Steven Kovel 


A. B., Princeton, 7957 


A. B., Columbia, 1957 


A. B., Yale, 1957 


2972 N. Hackett Ave. 


668 Northampton St. 


291 Hudson Ave. 


Milwaukee 1 1 , Wis. 


Easton, Pa. 


Roosevelt, N. Y. 






17 





Irene Lois Labourdette 

A. B., Oberlin, 1952 
M. A., Iowa, 1954 

Route #1 
Lincon Park, N. J. 



*to 



Arthur Lemlich 

e. S., Columbia, 1957 

80 Central Park West 

New York, N. Y. 



Munro Joseph Levitzky 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 

2824 Ave. I 
Brooklyn 10, N. Y. 




Stanley Luftschein 

A. 8., Columbia, 1957 

144-21 78th Ave. 

Flushing 67, N. Y. 



William E. Luikart 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 

28 Park Terrace East 

New York 34, N. Y. 






Thomas M. Mack 

A. B., Carleton, 1957 

Box 45 

Minden, Nev. 



18 



Ronald M. Maenza 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 

37-51 80 St. 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 







Donald J. Marcuse 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

ll 25 Park Ave. 
New York 34, N. Y. 




Arnold G. Marglin 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 
1208 N. Fuller Ave. 
Hollywood 46, Calif. 




v- 



wtl 



Frederick "Rusty" Melges 

A. B., Princeton, 7957 

314 Orchard Ave. 

Battle Creek, Mich. 



James H. Meyer 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 
2933 N. Lake Dr. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 




Arthur Theodore Meyerson 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 
550 G. Grand St. 
New York, N. Y. 




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i, 1 ~ i* 



19 





Robert J. Mulcare 

A. 8., Princeton, 1957 

510 East 23rd St. 
New York 10, N. Y. 




Walter Edward Morgan III 

A. B„ Wesley an, 1957 

47 Glen Ridge Parkway 

Glen Ridge, N. J. 



Benjamin A. Nachamie 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 

125 Maple St. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




V 

1,1 



Richard P. Nesti 

A. B., Columbia, 1954 

113 54th St. 
West New York, N. J. 



Robert M. Neer 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 
309 Miami St. 
Urbana, Ohio 




^ 



,«- -w- 




Francis D. O'Connell 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

16 Cross St. 

Uxbridge, Mass. 



20 





James L. Philip 

S. S., Michigan, 1957 

13 Scott St. 

Worcester, Mass. 



Otto H. Pfluger, Jr. 

A. B., Reed, 1957 
235 Landsdale Ave. 
San Francisco, Cal. 




William J. Powell 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

Box 151 Washington St. 

Duxbury, Mass. 




David Louis Pressman 

A.B., Harvard, 1957 
37 Central Ave. 
Chelsea, Mass. 




Helen C. Redman 

A. B., Rochester, 1957 
60 Hampshire Rd. 
Great Neck, N. Y. 



21 





Paul Richard Reich 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 
279 Lookout Ave. 
Hackensack, N. J. 



William Reichel 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 
807 Riverside Dr. 

New York 32, N. Y. 




Robert Carlyle 

Kimberly Riggins 

A. B., Yale, 1956 

840 Park Ave. 

New York 21, N. Y. 




*39* 1KT*- 





Michael Daniel Robbins, Jr. 

A. B., Amherst, 1955 
670 Tilden Ave. 
Teaneck, N. J. 



James A. Robinson 

A. B., Wesleyan, 1957 
389 Westchester Ave. 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. 




John Lee Robinson 

A. B., Yale, 1957 

6247 Underwood Ave. 

Omaha 3, Neb. 



22 




John F. Rosen 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

820 Park Ave. 

New York, N. Y. 




John Francis Ryan 

A. B., Boston College, 1957 

29 Woodlawn St. 
Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 




Sara Elizabeth Schuh 

A. B., Vassar, 1957 

65 Tanglewylde Ave. 

Bronxville, N. Y. 




Jane E. Schwarzberg 

A. B., Barnard, 1957 

15 West 75th St. 
New York 23, N. Y. 




William Schwartzman 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 

1 190 Shakespeare Ave. 

New York 52, N. Y. 




Robert Henderson Scott 

A. B., Carleton, 1957 

218 East 5th St. 
Northfield, Minn. 



23 




Louis Maier Sherwood 

A. 8., Johns Hopkins, 1957 

363 E. Old Country Rd. 

Hicksville, N. Y. 





Chull Song Song 

A. 8., Birmingham Southern, 1957 

Children's Relief Hosp. 

Seoul, Korea 



M. Leon Skolnick 

A. B v Columbia, 1957 

67-35 Alderton St. 

Forest Hills 74, N. Y. 





Susan Jane Standfast 


*~ 


A. 8., Wells, 1957 


, 


32 Oak St. 


V 


Binghampton, N. Y. 






Donald Day Stevenson 




A. 8., Princeton, 1957 




115 Oak St. 




Tenafly, N. J. 



William H. Stouch 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 

446 W. Market St. 

York, Pa. 






24 




Luther M. Strayer III 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 
1 Lordship Rd. 
Stratford. Conn. 




Stephen Terry 

A. B., 6. S., Arizona, 1957 

2250 No. Alvernon Way 

Tucson, Ariz. 




Irvin B. Teran 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 

48-68 189th St. 
Flushing 65, N. Y. 



John A. Talbotr 

A. B., Harvard, 1957 

880 Lake Shore Drive 

Chicago, 111. 






Eleanor Meneely Townsend 

A. B., Sarah Lawrence, 1957 

28 E. 72nd St. 

New York, N. Y. 



Richard Jerome Thurer 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 

76 Sackett St. 

Hicksville, N. Y. 




25 




Marjorie Tucker 

A. 6., Raddiffe, 1957 

2426 Ave. L 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Bart Lynch Troy 

A. B., Georgetown, 1957 

32 Larchmont Rd. 

Melrose, Mass. 




Eleanor E. Uprichard 

A. B., Rochester, 1958 

32 Alexander Rd. 

Yonkers, N. Y. 




Stephen L. Wanger 

A. B., Yale, 1957 
66 Lenox Ave. 
Albany, N. Y. 



Alan Anson Wanderer 

A. B., Earlham, 1957 

32-23 54th St. 
Woodside 77, N. Y. 





N~ 



Charles Gray Watson 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 

Rosslyn Farms 

Carnegie, Penna. 





P 



26 




Eric Taylor Weber 

8. A., Oberlin, 7957 

College Hill 

Clinton, N. Y. 



Richard Weil III 

A. B., Princeton, 7957 

28 East 70th St. 
New York 22, N. Y. 





Paul Tyler Wilson 

A. B., Columbia, 1954 

222 Courtland Ave. 

Park Ridge, 111. 



^04t H& 70-tlbCWtfc 




4u* 



Henry M. Bowers, Jr. 

Microbiology 





Betty Danes 

Copenhagen 



John N. Sheagren 

Pathology 



27 



Glass Officers 



FIRST Y 


EAR 


SECOND 


YEAR 


John Ryan 


President 


John Sheagren 


President 


Eric Weber 


Vice-President 


Marty Cohen 


Vice-President 


Helen Redman 


Secretary 


Helen Redman 


Secretary 


Tom Mack 


Treasurer 


Howard Corning 


Treasurer 



THIRD Y 


EAR 


FOURTH 


YEAR 


Ed Bowe 


President 


George Bullwinkel 


President 


Marty Cohen 


Vice-President 


Len Katz 


Vice-President 


Helen Redman 


Secretary 


Eleanor Uprichard 


Secretary 


Howard Corning 


Treasurer 


Fred Gregory 


Treasurer 



28 



The Classes of 



1962, 1963, 1964 



The College of 
Physicians and Surgeons 



Columbia University 



29 




Front row— Robert H. Humphries, Michael M. Bronshvag, J. Dennis Baker, Lawrence N. Rappaport, Joseph B. Priestley, Jr., 
Second row— John W. Reilly, Bruce L. Ballard, Anne C. Heroy, Preston Zucker, James H. Egan. Third row— John G. 
Kauderer, Jr., Robert T. Ricketts, Philip J. Rogal, Peter S. Chen, Arthur Hoyt, Claud S. Poliakoff. 



First Year 



Front row— Ronald Schreiber, Simon H. DeMuth, Joseph G. McCarthy, Robert D. Lewis, Anthony P. Pietropinto, John 
R. Brooks, David T. Bedell. Second row— Michael L. Gelfand, William E. Bowers, Jane A. Jamison, J. William Stilley, Akemi 
Takckoshi, Peter D. Kirchner, Charles A. Webb, Jr. Third row— William R. Hamilton, John G. Gregory, Paul D. Berk, 
Bartley R. Frueh, Gerald D. Buker, Walter A. Franck, Lewis R. Hamilton. 

CORHAM BEALES FRANCIS BULLOCK 
WILLIAM W CAHOON.fRANCIS P COLTON 
HENRY H CURTISS ENOCH CREEN 
HORATIO W CRIDLEY ELIHU T HEDGES 
PORTER A JUDSON RAND 
10 SELIGMA 

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QORKAM ft[ALCI FRANCIS BULLOCK 
WILLIAM W CAMOONFRAHCIS P COLTON 
HENRY H CURTISS ENOCH GRCCN 
HORAJIO W GRIPLEY EL1HU T HEDGES 




Front row— Martin N. Nemirow, Jose M. Berio, Jr., Charles P. Parsons, Daniel H. Golwyn, Robert T. Ogawa, William G. 
Friend, Gerald C. Sundahl. Franklin S. Musgrave. Second row— James E. Culver, Norman, A. Spencer, Marvin S. Gilbert, 
Thomas F. Gregg. Ralph S. Blume, Elaine E. Humphreys, Stephen F. Wang, George E. Gourrich, Richard A. Lipton, Gerald 
Frecdman, Ansis Zamelis. Third row— Nikolaus D. Langloh, John B. Mulliken, Mathew M. Rechler, David S. David, Howard 
M. Gerstel. Watson D. Reid, Jack C. Childers, William R. Vetter, Franklin G. de Furia. 



'64 



Front row— Jay A. Levy, Alfred I. Kaplan, Kenneth A. Marmar, Ian M. Reiss, Charles G. Reul, Stephen Doctoroff, Edmund 

Chaitman. Second row— Thomas L. Dent, William H. Lawrence, Jr., J. Phillip Kistler, Jeanne R. Willner, Anne C. 

Brower, Davida E. Taylor, Ariana B. Students, Theodore B. Robins, David V. Forrest, Robert L. Boothe, Bruce H. 

Platnik, David S. Svahn. Third row— William R. Wilson, Michael L. Sananman, Charles Crocker, A. Kenneth Blaydow, 
Bartley R. Frueh, Willard E. Andrews, Edward B. Turvey, Jr., Martin G. Groder, John P. Blass. 



~^*- 






CORHAM BEALES FRANCIS BULLOCK 
WILLIAM WCAH0ON.FRANCIS P COLTON 

HENRY H CURTISS ENOCH GREEN 
HORATIO W GRIDLEY ELIHJ^HEDGES 



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Front row— Edwin G. Fischer, Eli Wainstein, Jonathan L. Serxner, Michael Jay Rosenbaum, Marc J. Taylor, John S. Simmonds. 
Second row— Lawrence Krakoff, George S. Harell, LeClair M. Bissell, Jeanette C. Rodman, Maj-Britt Rosenbaum, David B. 
Davidson, Neil B. Blacklow. Third row— Clyde W. Chun, Jacob D. Lindy, David H. Bruce, Lloyd P. Kamins, Dudley A. 
Ferrari, Howard L. Wolfinger, Jr., W. Hallowell Churchill. 



Second Year 



Front row— Lawrence R. Silver, Allen D. Manzler, Joel M. Rein, Alfred L. Scherzer, Mark E. Kahn, Roger D. Cohen. Mayer 
Lightdale. Second row— Mark H. Pohlman, George W. Jordan, Daniel M. Musher, Babette B. Weksler, Geraldine Poppa, 
Eva J. Neer, Barbara J. Serber, Lanier M. Anderson, Harvard Yale Muhm, Arthur L. Brown, Dean S. Wood. Third row— William 
G. Nevel, Charles M. Smith, Louis E. Dickinson, Stephen S. Shonberg, Richard A. Dickey, Robert H. Heissenbuttel, 
Conrad Lattes, Richard A. Ryder, William J. Aronson. 




jjBCM 



0^ ^#> B 

GORHAM BEALES, FRANCIS BULLOCK! 
WILLIAM W CAHOON.FRANCIS P COLTON I 
HENRY H CURTISS ENOCH OREEN 
HORATIO W CRIDLEY. ELIHU T HEDGES. 
A JUDSON RAND. 
DAVID SE^ 
SIDNEY I 
HdENTS 



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GOSMAM SCALES FRANCIS BULLOCK 
WILLIAM W CAHOONFRANCIS PCOLTON 

HENRY H CURTISS ENOCH CREEK 
HORATIO W CBIDLEV ELIHU T HEOOES 




Front row— Clifton Howard, Robert D. Coli. Carl M. Hakanson, Philip P. Briska, Julian C- Zener, Gerald L. Mackler, 
Richard D. Pcrlman, Bernard M. Snyder, Samuel O. Essandoh. Second row— Richard A. Rudders, Robert A. Schaefer, 
Daniel B. Morgan, Peter T. Naiman, Jost Michclsen, William J. Schneider, Martin D. Felman, Harvey J. Brudner, Philip 
R. Larsen, George L. Paris, Frederick W. Tiley, John Noble III. Third row— John T. Murphy, Robert B. Page, Eugene M. 
Zweiback, Joel S. Hoffman, Wayne D. Cannon, Murray Epstein, Frederick L. Sachs, Stephen A. Feig, Jerry A. Wider, David 
N. Reifsnyder. 



'63 



Front row— Albert C. Lesneski, Jerome L. Shupack, Myron Lewis, James C. Reynolds, George S. Mauerman, Carmen I. 
Ortiz, Richard L. Banner, David T. Schwartz, Martin G. Rosenblatt. Second row— Michael G. Ehrlich, Stuart S. Howards, Elisabeth 
McSherry, Susan M. Fisher. Sandra E. Grant, Susan M. Deakins, Charles R. Steinman, David L. Scheiner, Robert M. Sade. 
Third row— Martin P. Geller. Robert S. Brown, David C. Kem, Allan N. Schcchter, Albert V. Assali, Bruce B. Nelson, 
Leonard I. Steinfeld, Robert M. Burd. 



e/ 



OORKAM BEALES FRANCIS BULLOCK 
WILLIAM WCAHQON FRANCIS P COLTON 
HENRY H CURTISS ENOCH CREEN 

HORATIO W ORIOLE* ELIHU T HEDGES 
HENRY W PORTER A JUOSON RAND 




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CORHAM BEALES FRANCIS BULLOCK 
WILLIAM WCAHOON.FR ANCIS P COLT ON 

HENRY H CURTISS ENOCH GREEN 
HORATIO W GRIDLEY ELIHU T HEDGES 

HENRY W PORTER A JUDSON RAND 
LEFROY RAVENHILL OAVID SELIGMAN 

JOHN SHOWQEN 510NEY B WORTH 
STl DENTS 




Front row— Jacob I. Haft, Warren D. Johnson, Jr., Despine L. Coulis, William G. Covey, Earl V. Fogelberg. Thomas A. 
Williams. Second row— Solan Chao, William J. Klein, Jr., Robert M. Herzberg, Myles M. Behrcns, Peter A. Immordino, 
Edwin Hankin, Michael N. Margolies, Donald A. Burress. 



Third Year 



Fronl row— Peter J. Puchner, Marc E. Weksler, Howard J. Zeft, Mary J. Kreek, Joel D. Weinstein, Eugene R. SchifT. John 
Sheagren. Second row— Henry M. Bowers, Bernard Talbot. Ian Nisonson, James W. Valuska, Peter Parry, K. William 
Waterson, Jr., Ganson Purcell, Jr. 




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CORHAM BEALES FRANCIS BULLOCK 
WILLIAM W CAMOON FRANCIS P COLTON 

HENRY H CURTISS. ENOCH GREEN. 
HORATIO W GRIDLEY ELIHU T HEDGES 

HENRY W PORTER A JUDSON RAND 
LEFROY RAVENHILL DAVID SELIGMAN 

JOHN SNOWDEN SIDNEY B WORTH 
STUDENTS 



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GORHAM SCALES TRANCIS BULLOCK 
WILLIAM W CAHOON FRANCIS P COLTON 

MCNRY H CURTISS ENOCH GREEN 
HORATIO W GRJOLCY ELI 




1 'I'.r 



Front row— Howard H. Berman, Joel S. Karliner. Robert B. Gollancc, Howard A. Fox, Robert A. Gutstein, C. Warren 
Brown, Dong Su Kim. Second row— William C. Duncan III. Stephen V. Flagg, John C. M. Brust, Anne Van N. Gamble. 
Robinette N. Bell, Marcia A. Bull. Sherman M. Bull. Harold M. Brack, John S. Kovach. Third row— Donald C. Bell, Joel 
A. Kraut, Norbert Hirschhorn. Herman M. Frankel, James M. Campbell, Peter A. Cassileth, Peter B. Barlow. Andrew J. 
Fran zone. 



'62 



Front row— Stephen E. Silver, Richard I. Ulin. Thomas H. Steele, Henry R. McCarroll, Irving J. Lerner, Khosrow Nasr. 
Second row— Howard L. Kilburn, Frank R. Smith, David J. Patck, Alton L. Steiner, Barbara J. Rosen, Betty S. Danes, 
Lawrence Margolies, Barry R. Walker, Elihu N. Root. Third row— William P. Lovejoy, Timothy H. Smelzer, Nicholas A. Romas, 
Thomas S. Reese, Robert S. Waldbaum. Henry A. Solomon, Timothy S. Shuster. Salvatore J. Pagliaro. 

GORHAM SCALES FRANCIS BULLOCK.! 
WILLIAM W CAHOON FRANCIS P COLTON.! 
HENRY H CURTISS ENOCH GREEN 
HORATIO W CRIOLEY ELIH UJ HEOCES 
HEHPY W PORTER A 
INHILL DA' 
□ EN SID> 




\ 



fh 



rs b ? fh 



0. 



♦ ■■ i 



A. 



a 



iLL 



The Examination 



Prof. If to me leave is given by Dominus Praeses, 
Et tanti docti doctores, 
Et assistantes illustres, 
Quern estimo and honoro, 
Learnidissimo bacheliere 
I will ask the cause and reason why 
Opium causes sleep. 

c. c. Mihi a docto doctore 

Demandatur causam and rationem, quare 

Opium facit dormire. 

To which respondeo, 

Because it has a 

Soporific virtue 

And is specific 

In soothing our senses. 

MD's. Bene, bene, bene, bene respondere, 
Dignus, dignus est intrare 
In nostro docto corpore. 
Bene, bene respondere. 

Prof. Cum permissione domini praesidis. 
Doctissimae facultatis, 
Et totius his nostris actis 
Companiae assistantis, 
Demandabo tibi, docte bacheliere. 
Quae sunt remedia, 
Quae in maladia 
Called hydropisia 
Convenit facere? 

c. c. Clisterium donare, 
Postea bleedare, 
Afterwards purgare. 

MD's. Bene, bene, bene, bene respondere, 
Dignus, dignus est intrare 
In nostro docto corpore. 

Prof. Si bonum semblatur domine praesidi, 
Doctissimae facultati 
Et companiae praesenti, 
Demandabo tibi, docte bacheliere, 
Quae remedia eticis, 
Pulmonicis atque asmaticis 
Do you think a propos facere. 



c. c. Clisterium donare, 
Postea bleedare, 
Afterwards purgare. 

MD's. Bene, bene, bene, bene respondere: 
Dignus, dignus est intrare 
In nostro docto corpore. 

Prof. Concerning illas maladias, 

Doctus bachelierus dixit maravillas: 
But if I do not tease and fret dominum 

praesidem, 
Doctissimam facultatem, 
Et totam honorabilem 
Companiam hearkennantem; 
Faciam illi unam quaestionem. 
Last night patientus unus 
Chanced to fall in meas manus: 
Habet grandam fievram cum 

redoublamentis 
Grandum dolorem capitis, 
Et grandum malum in his si-de, 
Cum granda difficultate 
Et pena respirare. 
Be pleased then to tell me, 
Docte bacheliere, 
Quid illi facere. 

c. c. Clisterium donare, 
Postae bleedare, 
Afterwards purgare. 

Prof. But if maladia 
Opiniatria 
Non vult se curire, 
Quid illi facere? 

c. c. Clisterium donare, 
Postae bleedare, 
Afterwards purgare. 
Rebleedare, repurgare, and reclysterisare. 

MD's. Bene, bene, bene, bene respondere: 
Dignus, dignus est intrare 
In nostro docto corpore. 

from Moliere "La Malade Imaginaire" 



36 




n 



& 








77ie Saga of 



Four Years at 



The College of 



Physicians and Surgeons 



37 



One hot sticky day in September, 1957, an eager bouncy youth in 
chinos and open-necked shirt stepped out of the East Side Airline Terminal, 
hired a cab for $4 to transport his baggage uptown, and registered at the 
Columbia Medical School. The following June he tumbled out of Bard 
Hall and trundled his sole bulging bag on the subway for 15c to the Port 
Authority. The difference— Scientific Enlightenment. For eight laff-Filled 
months he had stuffed his scarred brain with crucial facts concerning the 
longest muscle in the body, the rotation of the gut in utero and in the bag, 
and the number of toes a Polynesian woman really has. And now it was 
back to Squaresville, USA, to tell all the wonderful folks about the funny- 
bone tickling adventures in Gross Lab., the cat in Physio, who blew up 
after simultaneous overhydration and mercury poisoning, and the missing 
lab. partner in Biochem. Musing in his murky memory, the frisky frosh 
thinks of the lights under the door at 2 o'clock, paralysis of the right hand, 
and permanent formaldehyde-induced anosmia. 





WILFRED M. COPENHAVER, PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. DOROTHY D. JOHNSON, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 

What do you mean the course isn't dynamic? ANATOMY. Bailey, daily, else you failee. 



GEORGE D. PAPPAS, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. 
C-A-J-A-L; Cahal! 



Musical microscopes. 



GEORGE K. SMELSER, PROFES- 
SOR OF ANATOMY. Isn't this a 
cute little cell. 





38 





CHARLES R. NOBACK, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. The 
walrus . . . 




WILLIAM M. ROGERS, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. Out to 
lunch. 



MALCOLM B. CARPENTER, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. 
. . . and the Carpenter. 



But it was not all fun. And while some sat home revelling in the 
intoxicating sensuality of Grant and Cunningham, others were out research- 
ing in the field. One scientific soul was so deluged in his Greenwich project 
that he returned to Bard only once a week to check on test dates. Another 
group of straight-thinkers bought a table at the TG to insure the previous 
evening's toil could go on without pause. And it was rumored that one 
evening at the Met, Dr. Ely counted fourteen erstwhile anatomists leaning 
over the brass rail studying suprasternal notches. But no pleasure equalled 
that of the bimonthly 10th floor sprints— collisions were numerous, tinnitus 
prevailed, and crafty individuals moved tags from muscle to bone and back. 




Lett: Plink, plink. 

Right: CHARLES A. ELY, ASSIS- 
TANT PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. 
And this is the T-zone. 





Lett: May we pick your brains? 
Right: Now for the third time. 



39 



L:~^'- $t 


MBPMl.TfL 






* •$ 


-"tr niA.'.. 


H 


tM 








^^i ^v %. i d4 . & . 




Ai 

I 







We didn't send it flowers, 
because it wasn't ours. 




HERBERT O. ELFTMAN, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. No, that 
is not your lottery number. 



ALBERT FREYER, ALFRED E. NEU- 
MAN PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. 
They drive a stiff bargain at Bellevue. 



Are you awake up there, Campbell? 



The garbage man came today but we didn't need any more. 





OTTHEINRICH HASE, INSTRUCTOR 
IN ANATOMY. Oh, that this too 

solid flesh might melt. 




MELVIN L. MOSS, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF ANATOMY. Ya got it 
right, friend. Two zombies . . . 



FREDERICK J. AGATE, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. Ashes 
to ashes. 





40 




MAGNUS I. GREGERSEN, JOHN C. 
DALTON PROFESSOR OF PHYSIO- 
LOGY. T for two. 





WILLIAM W. WALCOTT, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY. 
Funny! It worked 20 years ago. 



WALTER S. ROOT, PROFESSOR OF 
PHYSIOLOGY. Somebody up there 
likes me. 




WILLIAM L. NASTUK, PROFESSOR 
OF PHYSIOLOGY. 3 gross of giant 
squid axons, and a bottle of Tabasco 
Sauce. 



LOUIS J. CIZEK, ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY. Anything 
tastes good with a little orange juice. 




One of the lab personel working on 
a difficult problem. 




In the spring, tring-a-ling, a young man's fancy usually turns to things 
other than frog's legs, and after a month we all felt as though we'd been 
through the Ringers. All 72 females lied about their weights in the normalcy 
experiment and the class set a new average of 120 lbs per person. Judging 
from the large numbers of absentees, antivivisection was on the rise, and 
civil disobedience reached a new high with the P&S equivalents of the 
Aldermaston marchers treking to Teeterboro Airport. One discovery of 
note was that the Eleven Blue Men we had heard about were the discoverers 
of Evans Blue. In spite of hell and high water, compliments of Cizek, how- 
ever, the fittest survived, although many of man's best did not. 



41 





DAVID RITTENBERG, PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY, 
suppose you want to practice medicine. 



DAVID SHEMIN, PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. Sorry, 
I can't make it. I'm wrestling tonight. 



Irmd Rombauer became the patron-saint of the second semesterites, 
and everyone was immersed in mixing, mashing and mushing things 
together, apart and around. After a while, however, the fun stopped like 
a resident at midnight, because Redman and Mulcare finished 15 minutes 
before anyone else, no matter how many steps one omitted— and they 
got 500% yield. Ma Berry, president of the Washington Heights S. S., 
was never present, always there. And no one to my knowledge ever got 
that pizza pie Dr. Rittenberg was so fond of socratically giving away, which 
goes to show either the course is beyond saving or everyone hates pizza. 



I wonder if this is denatured. 



ZACHARIS DISCHE, PROFESSOR OF 
BIOCHEMISTRY. Zero and double 
zero are house numbers. 



Where's Mr. Stuart? 






42 




DAVID NACHMANSOHN, PROFES- 
SOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY? Questions? 
How could there be questions when 
I made myself so lucidly clear? 




KARL MEYER, PROFESSOR OF BIO- 
CHEMISTRY. The reason I ask is . . . 




ERWIN CHARGAFF, PROFESSOR OF 
BIOCHEMISTRY. But politically fats 
are never neutral. 



Somehow it's not the same without 
heat. 




BARBARA W. LOW, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 
Why have you not got these data in 
your notebook? 



- 



r 



j\ 



HEINRICH B. WAELSCH, PROFES- 
SOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. I work at 
P. I. out of preference. 




<S 



PARITHCHERY SRINIVASAN, AS- 
SISTANT PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEM- 
ISTRY. Why should I? You don't 
speak Pakistani. 




But we're not trying to make bio- 
chemists out of you, just technicians. 




STEPHEN ZAMENHOF, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 
ZNA. 



m r « J 




43 



Second year students. Conquerors of the world, masters of men, 
snowers of women. Experienced, daring, studious. Actually it was just 
like first year except nobody cleaned his white coats. The year began with 
a flurry of Shigella infections which Harry Rose blamed on newlywed wives, 
claiming his strains were all harmless. Others insisted Bard or P. H. must 
be at fault, but the "in" knew the T.G. had been serving diseased steak, 
which had sat unpurchased all summer. Venipunctures and/or bone mar- 
rows were somewhat disabling, but naught equalled the ego-squashing 
trauma of Kabat's Kwizes. Several Mantoux's turned positive, one girl 
maintained the treponemal demonstration was "live," but despite the odds 
of 2:1 (faculty-.students) more people passed the final than there are blood 
groups. 




] tm ii 




BEATRICE C. SEEGAL, PROFESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. 
Mix platypus anti-mongoose-gamma-globulin serum with 
ocelot-globulin-coated mink red blood cells. 



HARRY M. ROSE, JOHN E. BOURNE PROFESSOR OF 
MEDICAL AND SURGICAL RESEARCH. You must have 
gotten it at Reme's. 



But you gave that lecture. 



CALDERON HOWE, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MI- 
CROBIOLOGY. Your serology is positive. 




44 






You never know the answers. 



ELVIN A. KABAT, PROFESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. If 
the baby is ABDdEE Kell +, Duffy — ... 




Where'd you get these spirochetes? 



Bye, bye, bunny. 




ALICE W. KNOX, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. Rien 
ne va plus. 



Corning, did you spit in this? 



can't see any either. 




45 




fifc^ 








COUNCILMAN MORGAN, ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. I don't care if 
it's pathogenic, is it photogenic? 



* 




fV< 


W4* 


Mm* 




/■ 




i 


pr^j 


;f 



GABRIEL C. GODMAN, ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. The most happy 
fibroblast. 




fp m 






Thank you, that's a compliment. 



Enteric Pathogens 
Above left: BERNARD F. ERLANGER, AS- 
SOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. 
Above right: S. A. ELLISON, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. 
Left: SAM M. BEISER, ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. 
Right: STUART W. TANENBAUM, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. 





KATHLEEN L. HUSSEY, AS- 
SOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
PARASITOLOGY. Sitting on 
one looking at another. 





ROGER W. WILLIAMS, AS- 
SOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
PARASITOLOGY. The worm 
turns. 



HAROLD W. BROWN, PROFESSOR OF PARASITOLOGY. 
Don't you ever call me that again. 



A sinister plot to brainwash the student body, attempting to make them 
believe Public Health officers are for Medicine not agin it, began in the 
first year. Here we were exposed to one of the slickest men who ever ran 
a numbers game, giving it all up to do research in random numbers, or 
more practically— how to win at the big wheel. Then Dr. Brown and his 
carefree scotch-tapers moved in, with offers of free trips to pre-MGM 
Africa, complete with house-boys, canoe-service, and dysentery. Third year 
culminated this program, monumental in scope, with Dr. Goldwater, un- 
related to but as rational as the Senator, and his troup of singers, dancers, 
social workers, and outhouse builders. Fourth year, I am told, there was 
a class in Forensic Medicine. 



LEONARD J. GOLDWATER, PROFES- 
SOR OF OCCUPATIONAL MEDI- 
CINE. I have this letter from the 
National Boards . . . 



GEORGE L. SAIGER, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF BIOSTATISTICS. At 



ease, men. 





47 





1 


A. 



DOUGLAS G. McKAY, FRANCIS 
DELAFIELD PROFESSOR OF PATH- 
OLOGY. You may throw away your 
smudge sticks. 




.< 



— r- 



D. W. BENNINGHOFF, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY. I have 
five autoanalysers and a cretin work- 
ing for me. 




Be happy in your work. 



So we flunked him. 



Awake again. 



It seems ihe better part of the year was spent shuffling between two 
imaginative places—the peep-show and the autopsy suite, with a heavy 
dose of glauming inflammation and repair. Most compulsives and con- 
formists sharpened their pencils zestfully, occasionally losing a finger-tip 
on the finest edges ever honed, but some angry young men broke their 
smudge sticks in defiance and even went so far as to replace their mechan- 
ical stages. It must be said, though, that the Pathologists were good drinkers, 
which helped increase the stature of a dying department. 



The newsreel's still on. 



Sure this course stinks. That's the 
way we designed it. 



What topography? 






48 





A 



HA 



L'il Abner cheated. 



ABNER WOLF, PROFESSOR OF NEU- 
ROPATHOLOGY. Darkness at noon. 



10% is hardly enough. 



Quasi bookmakers set up shop in Neuropathology and just as business 
was booming, a price-war began with Teran giving discounts, forcing Allen 
to sell short, the resultant depression found long lines of students outside 
the bookstore waiting for apples. But we soon took to operating on live 
things, and some operations were completely bloodless. It was slow work 
though, tying off vessel after vessel, so most of us aimed for rapid exsan- 
guination, the panacea for man and his best. 



RAFFAELE LATTES, PROFESSOR OF 
SURGICAL PATHOLOGY. Procedure: 
lymph node biopsy. Spec: norma! liver. 



NATHAN LANE, ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF SURGICAL PATHOLOGY. Pro- 
cedure: polypectomy. Spec: Well, it's 
a funny thing . . . 





VIRGINIA KNEELAND FRANTZ, PROFESSOR OF 
SURGERY. It's definitely a counterfeit. 



If you liked it so much, you can take it again. 




49 





Pharmo was Columbia's answer to Chem 20, and with 5 Feisers, on 
TV yet, to boot. Slugged, drugged and myopic/ hypermetropic we stag- 
gered through the spring with one hand on the throttle and the other on 
the bottle. The paradox was that van Dyke and Pharmocology are false, 
false, related. 





X 






» I 



^:i r 



50 



~2 

m 




Oh, oh. 



r. 


i 




• 



•- ^ 




Above: Great Dane. 
Left: YALE KNEELAND, JR., PRO- 
FESSOR OF MEDICINE. The A, B & 
G has some use after all. 



Just when it seemed that all would come crashing down, in stepped 
Dr. Kneeland, a virtual non-smoker, to instruct us in sounds, like real sounds, 
man. Goldwater coughed up its oldest fossils and even Bellevue found a 
few live patients to thump and bump. And we were clinicians! 




Research 



A house is not a home. 





The Maxwell roof 



51 



The following vitriolic definitions were found one sphygmotonometer- 
grey December morning on a soggy piece of crumpled filter paper in the 
8th floor lab. A Clinician— a person ready and able to do venipunctures, 
set up IV's, and count reticulocytes in his sleep, or almost. Responsibility— 
a reward for knowing the normal body distribution of magnesium. Clerk— 
a man who knows nothing about anything, but is expected to do it anyway. 
Intern — a friend when you help him, he forgets your name on rounds. 
Resident— the nearest thing to an overeducated boor. Attending— the enemy. 
Nurse— someone who knows more than you about everything but horse 
racing. Lab technicians— long whitecoats and coffee-breaks distinguish 
them from students. 




STANLEY E. BRADLEY, SAMUEL BARD PROFESSOR 
OF MEDICINE. Nausee-ated. 



Yesterday he was feeling fine. But now . . 

I 



He's gone, poor devil. 




52 





Gentlemen, I take great pleasure in introduc- 
ing an eminent professor of medicine, and out- 
standing cardiologist, a brilliant researcher, a 
teacher of the first water, — in short a man of 
whom I have the utmost esteem — 



GEORGE A. PERERA, PROFESSOR OF MEDI- 
CINE. Thank you. 




DANA W. ATCHLEY, PROFESSOR 
EMERITUS OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. 
You can learn more by taking a good 
history than living it. Don't you agree, 
George? 



JOHN V. TAGGART, PROFESSOR OF 
MEDICINE. Quick, they're after me. 




DR. JOSEPH TURNER 



JOSEPH W. JAILER 




53 





I Hi — I^J 




CHARLES RAGAN, PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. I learned that 
at my mother's knee, or some other 
crooked joint. 



HAMILTON SOUTHWORTH, CLINI- 
CAL PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE. Out 
of that phone booth and back to bed. 




FREDERICK R. BAILEY, CLINICAL 
PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE. Is a ve- 
nous pressure going to make her feel 
better? 







Before 



ALFRED P. FISHMAN, ASSOCIATE After. 
PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE. Youse is 
a good boy, Dennie. 



SIDNEY C. WERNER, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDI- 
CINE. For lunch I eat turnips, soy 
beans, and raw rotabajus. 




CHARLES A. FLOOD, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDI- 
CINE. I prescribe Bland #6. 




HENRY ARANOW, ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. 
The only physical findings were two 
tiny puncture marks at the base of 
the neck. 




54 






HENRY 0. WHEELER, AS- 
SISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
MEDICINE. When I was on 
the house staff . . . 



NICHOLAS P. CHRISTY, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF MEDICINE. But Chaplin got a 
laugh. 



Next time 



*7w® ^aiiacU fai /atefwt&fo 



Ibi fever, ubi pus, 

Ich ne wat. 
Post hoc, propter hoc, 

Surgeons cut. 



Wonderful little, when all is said. 

Wonderful little our fathers knew. 

Half their remedies cured you dead — 

Most of their teaching was quite untrue- 
Kipling 



JAT 



DAVID SCHACHTER, ASSISTANT PROFES- 
SOR OF MEDICINE. Not rucksack, gut sack. 



DONALD F. TAPLEY, ASSISTANT PROFES- 
SOR OF MEDICINE. You say she barfed? 





55 










\l3 


i _) 




^j 




H5 




| j 



ALBERT R. LAMB, JR. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 

CLINICAL MEDICINE 

No, you must bring a note from your 

mother. 



KERMIT L. PINES 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE 
What do you mean you can't hear me? 

A plague on both your houses. 





HELEN M. ANDERSON 

ASSOCIATE IN MEDICINE 

I'd say off tackle. 



I know he died, but how far was it 
from the Bendix to the dryer? 





JOHN H. LARAGH 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 

CLINICAL MEDICINE 

The Unattending. 




CHARLES K. CHRISTIAN 
INSTRUCTOR IN MEDICINE 
Well, at least it's a factor in rheum- 
atoid. 




ROBERT C. DARLING 

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE 

AND REHABILITATION 

Don't just lie there, get up and try again. 



And what disease do we think of in old 
seamen, Dr. Hatfield? 




56 





ALFRED GELLHORN 

PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE 

I'm a tobacco man, not a medicine man. 




JOHN E. ULTMANN 
INSTRUCTOR IN MEDICINE 
I've just got a bright idea. 




Our mailing list's in Dakar. 



ARTHUR R. WERTHEIM 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE 

No man is an island. 




ELLIOTT F. OSSERMAN 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE 
It will probably turn out to be kala-azar, 
but in Delafield . . . 




At P&S, nearly everyone reads 



ANDRE F. COURNAND 

PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE 

Round trip to Stockholm, please. 




M. IRENE FERRER and REJANE HARVEY 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS OF CLINICAL" MEDICINE 

Don't worry Dr. Malm. 




57 



DICKINSON W. RICHARDS 

SAMUEL W. LAMBERT 
PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE 
I'm really quite compliant. 




s 



• 





EDWARD C. CURNEN, REUBEN S. 
CARPENTIER, PROFESSOR OF PEDIA- 
TRICS. Wait'll next year. 



RUSTIN MclNTOSH, PROFESSOR EME- 
RITUS OF PEDIATRICS. No more paint, 
OK? 



Rustin Mcintosh retired the year after the T. G. burned down. Neither 
event, although catastrophic, was irremediable, and about the same time 
the home away from home acquired new genuine imitation palm-trees 
Babies announced that Dr. Edward Curnen would soon arrive with a passel 
of pacifiers to placate the peds. J. C. Taylor, who was offered the position, 
prefered to stay on for an unprecidented 9th year of residency. The fourth 
year clerkship differed from third year in that attendings lectured to attend- 
ings, rather than students to students. 

J. C. TAYLOR, ASSISTANT IN PE- 
DIATRICS. Ay, down the years, be- 
hold. He rides. 




HATTIE E. ALEXANDER, PROFES- 
SOR OF PEDIATRICS, and RUTH C. 
HARRIS, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
PEDIATRICS. When shall we two 
meet again? 





DOROTHY H. ANDERSEN, PROFES- 
SOR OF PATHOLOGY. Put it in my 
mailbox; I'll do it after lunch. 

Now I'm not questioning your expert 
opinion, but . . . 




JAMES A. WOLFF, ASSOCIATE 
CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF PEDIA- 
TRICS. Blood, toil, tears and sweat. 







■ 




■ 



SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL, PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL PEDIATRICS. I haven't 
the heart. 



'.V 





WILLIAM A. SILVERMAN, ASSO. 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
PEDIATRICS. I prefer not to havfj 
it called "baby-farming." 




DOUGLAS S. DAMROSH, ASSOCIATE 
CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF PEDIA- 
TRICS. Children should be seen, . . . 



DAVID S. BAKER, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF RADIOLOGY. According 
to my figures, your bone age is 3 Vz 
years. 



JOHN M. BRUSH, ASSOCIATE CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR OF PEDIATRICS. 
I've a shocking story to tell you. 



WILLIAM A. BLANC, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF PATHOLOGY. What peculiar 
ears you have! 



CHARLES L. WOOD, ASSOCIATE CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR OF PEDIATRICS. It's 
the croop or the colic. 




5° 





LAWRENCE C. KOLB, PROFESSOR OF PSYCHIATRY. I won't commit myself. 

When it came fime to be analysed, half fhe class fook off for Orienfe 
Province. But those who remained had a unique experience in seeing how 
easily months of psychotherapy were reversed by one student interview. 
The outpatient clinic experience merely affirmed what everybody had 
always known— the ones in P.I. got caught. And maybe they weren't so 
badly off— after all, on the outside attendants couldn't make passes at 
them. In spite of it all, some remembrances were pleasant— the back-wards 
at Manhattan, Letchworth Village, and shock therapy. And Dr. Horowitz 
had the good sense to get everyone crocked before Exams which showed 
psychiatrists are human beings. 



WILLIAM A. HOROWITZ, PROFES- 
SOR OF CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY. 
But I tell you, Sergeant, they're after 
me. 



We don't treat realistic problems. 




60 




PHILLIP POLITAN, PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY. Don't 
move, I've got a gun under this desk. 







H. DONALD DUNTON, ASSISTANT 
CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF PSYCHI- 
ATRY. And right in the middle of all 
that company . . . 

SIDNEY MALITZ, ASSISTANT CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR OF PSYCHIATRY. 
Pheno-what? 



WILLIAM S. LANGFORD, PROFES- 
SOR OF PSYCHIATRY. Tell 'em 
Laertes sent you. 



HILDE BRUCH, CLINICAL PROFES- 
SOR OF PSYCHIATRY. Well, with 
Metrecal and grapefruit . . . 



DONALD KORNFELD, INSTRUCTOR 
IN PSYCHIATRY. But that's not 
what we mean by therapy. 




Please don't go back to Mars. 





A normal American family. 



Next 





Cha-cha-cha. 




61 




H. HOUSTON MERRITT, PROFESSOR OF NEUROLOGY 
This is the house that jack built. 

The big boys now had safefy pins in their lapels, reflex hammers in 
their pockets, and knowing grins on their faces. Sharp examiners were 
they, history-takers extraordinaire and fast-thinkers. Diagnosticians in their 
glory, who could pin down the lesion, so to speak, within a millimeter of 
accuracy. And treatment, well . . . Some insisted they knew which eye 
muscles turned how, and a few claimed knowledge of EEG's, but for the 
rest assurance that La Monroe was in good hands was enough. And as 
a fitting climax, Dr. Merritt's end-all parties were worth the course alone, 
so long as you weren't stupid and/or drunk enough to play poker with him. 



SIDNEY CARTER, PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL NEUROLOGY. I'll never 
fall for another doll who was put to 
sleep with Luminal. 



CARMINE T. VICALE, PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL NEUROLOGY. Would 
you care to see my Oscars? 





62 



DANIEL SCIARRA, ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL NEUROLOGY. 
The eyes that sparkle . . . 




WILLIAM AMOLS, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL NEUROLOGY. 
Cold hands, warm heart. 





J. LAWRENCE POOL, PROFESSOR OF 
NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY. So we 
did a craniotomy and, by George, she 
did have bats in her belfry. 



PAUL F. A. HOEFER, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF NEUROLOGY. Gooot 
morning. 




The Neuro Grin. 




and legs that twitch. 




A ^ 



ELI S. GOLDENSOHN, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF NEUROLOGY. This 
is odd. The report says ST-T wave 
changes compatible with cerebral 
damage and/or drug effect. 




63 



Cut, slash, mash, bash. Upwards and onwards, backwards, down- 
wards. The life of a surgeon is not an easy one, but lots of action, lots of 
fun. Two months of surgery convinced even the most hardened cynic that 
it's good clean fun to get up at seven, hold retractors for half a day, and 
miss lunch. And such progress in responsibility. After venipunctures came 
putting in TV's, and when you got that down pat they moved you up to 
cut-downs, under supervision. The acme, of course, was to be permitted 
to do something BIG, like dressing wounds or irrigating colostomies. And 
for sheer enjoyment nothing equalled the thrill of telling the operator 
how much blood was lost in c.c.'s rather than Texas ml.'s. 




GEORGE H. HUMPHREYS II, VALENTINE MOTT PRO- 
FESSOR OF SURGERY. Happy February 14th. 



RUDOLF N. SCHULLINGER, PROFES- 
SOR OF CLINICAL SURGERY. Eat, 
drink, and be merry . . . 



LAWRENCE W. SLOAN, PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL SURGERY. Speed is 
not essential. 




Halsteadian technique in operation. 




f + -> *M 



"»' L4 




64 




CUSHMAN D. HAAGEN- 
SEN, PROFESSOR OF CLIN- 
ICAL SURGERY. No, I'll 
have a leg. 

DAVID V. HABIF, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. It's 
not the same Bard. 




GEORGE F. CRIKELAIR, PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL SURGERY. It won't 
show. 



HENRY S. F. COOPER, ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PRO- 
FESSOR OF SURGERY. Well, I might suggest cautery. 




MILTON R. PORTER, AS- 
SOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. USS 
Porter. 

HAROLD G. BARKER, AS- 
SOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. The 
picture is not entirely clear. 






ARTHUR H. BLAKEMORE, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
SURGERY. The viscera were exposed 
through the customary cross-bow in- 
cision. 



ROBERT H. E. ELLIOTT, JR., ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
SURGERY. It's asymptomatic only 
when it's out. 



RICHMOND L. MOORE, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL SURGERY. 
It's a matter of philosophy . . . 






65 




CARL R. FEIND, INSTRUCTOR IN 
SURGERY. It's F-E-l-N-D 





THOMAS V. SANTULLI, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL SURGERY. 
What's a fistula between friends. 




JOHN PRUDDEN, INSTRUC- 
TOR IN SURGERY. Fortu- 
nately I was able to shrink 
them without painful sur- 
gery. 

ROBERT B. HIATT, ASSIS- 
TANT PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. It's 
all a matter of motility. 



PHILIP D. WEIDEL, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL SURGERY 
and EDMUND N. GOODMAN, AS- 
SISTANT CLINICAL PROFESSOR. 
East is East and West is West . . . 



I 




JAMES R. MALM, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SUR- 
GERY. With your murmurs you have good grades. 



JOSE FERRER, ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR. No, 
I'm not related to that one. 




GRANT SANGER, ASSIS- 
TANT PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. The 
surgery lectures are the only 
place I can get a nap. 

HAROLD D. HARVEY, 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL SURGERY. 
I didn't make any errors 
in that book. 





66 




EMANUEL M. PAPPER, PROFESSOR 
OF ANESTHESIOLOGY. My depart- 
ment's a gasser. 



BERNARD R. FINK, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF ANESTHESIOLOGY. 
Dogs can't sue you. 






L. STANLEY JAMES, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF PEDIATRICS. Oh tell 
the mother we're bathing him. 



CYRIL SANGER, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF ANESTHESIOLOGY. I use 
it because I like the green color of 
the cap. 



EDGAR C. HANKS, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF ANESTHESIOLOGY. 
Report back at 0300. 




"Now it we stop breathing for the patient . . . see . . . the blood turns 
blue . . . awfully fast . . . wait now!!!" "The big thing here is to keep the 
luggering surgeon off the patient, remember you're the boss, . . . sorry Sir, 
we'll up the N-O. . . ." "And don't forget to get it in the trachea, we had 
one patient swallow Fluothane for an hour— ha ha." "If they say he's lost 
200 cc's, double it." "It's not so bad actually, keeps you away from people." 



67 




FRANK E. STINCHFIELD, PROFESSOR OF ORTHO- 
PEDIC SURGERY. Dr. Sertoli's what? 



At various intervals in the last two years we were apprenticed for a 
few weeks to the bone-crushers. Big hands, heavy feet and smiling faces. 
A cheerful group that loves to hear the crunch of bone as it breaks through 
the periosteum, to tighten the winches on the scoliosis rack, or drill, saw 
and nail with gay abandon. Skiing is a favorite avocation, perhaps more 
out of anticipation than enjoyment. In my book, literally and figuratively, 
the most amiable well-liked teaching department in the hospital. 



LEONIDAS A. LANTZOUNIS, CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, and 
HARRISON L. McLAUGHLIN, PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. Let's 
settle this down at the plaster room. 




68 




r f I 



HALFORD HALLOCK, PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL ORTHOPEDIC SUR- 
GERY. Young man, you're standing 
on my bunion. 

SAWN IE R. GASTON, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL ORTHO- 
PEDIC SURGERY. If we can't fuse, 
there is one alternative. 




You gotta have Hart. 




WILLIAM H. VON LACKUM, ASSIS- 
TANT CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF 
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. So we 
lengthened her metacarpel. 



ALEXANDER GARCIA, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL ORTHO- 
PEDIC SURGERY. Eighteen, please. 




CHARLES S. NEER II, 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF ORTHOPEDIC SUR- 
GERY. You bonehead. 




FREDERICK S. CRAIG, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL ORTHO- 
PEDIC SURGERY. I'm really a car- 
penter, but I believe every man 
should have a hobby. 

BARBARA B. STIMSON, ASSISTANT 
CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF ORTHO- 
PEDIC SURGERY. I'm not saying how 
this Vassar girl broke her hip. 






ALAN DeFOREST SMITH, PROFESSOR 
EMERITUS OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. I 
took these at Minsky's. 



69 






HOWARD C. TAYLOR, PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY. Chief of Cervix. 



D. ANTHONY D'ESOPO, PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OB- 
STETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. ROP. 



GILBERT A. VOSBERG, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY. You don't have to 
be embarrassed, I'm a doctor. 



I 



ANNA L. SOUTHAM, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY. Two heads are better 
than one. 



SEYMOUR LIEBERMAN, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF BIO-CHEMISTRY. 
But her 17-ketos, oo-la-la. 




fe 



/ 





There was a time, not so long ago, when young student, he, thought 
babies were to mothers as grapes to the vine. But alas came enlightening 
daybreak, and with it the revelation: to whit, baby, he, cannot make his 
sneaky exit from watery haven until XRays of pelvis determine he is there 
indeed, maternal harbor is flooded with Scop, Atropine, Phenobarb, 
Demerol, N l O, Cyclo, and ice-picks placed about his egg-shell top, pulled 
from succoring home like cork from aged wine, with less pop. 'Tis that, or 
worser still, a midnight ride down dimmed and slicky corridor— baby on 
bed, mother on baby, doctor on mother, and nurses pushing at 35 MPH. 
A mouth full of slime, a shirt soaked with blood, and waters in his face— 
the clerk stands proudly holding baby aloft, upside down. 



70 




^~~~~- •"•" 





SAUL R. GUSBERG, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY. No, it doesn't stand 
for Dusting and Cleaning. 



STANLEY M. BYSSHE, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTET- 
RICS AND GYNECOLOGY. Call a 
doctor. 



CHARLES M. STEER, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTET- 
RICS AND GYNECOLOGY. How did 
it get in, if it can't get out? 




fe Zl*i 



1 



DR. PAUL O'CONNELL 
SLOANE CLINIC 



EMANUEL A. FRIEDMAN, ASSIST- 
ANT PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY. Every day is 
Labor Day. 





RAYMOND L. VANDE WIELE 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOL- 
OGY. But madam, you just had 
one. 

Well, we got the head anyway. 




11 h^h 





EQUINN W. MUNNELL, ASSOCIATE 
CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF OBSTET- 
RICS AND GYNECOLOGY. What, me 
teach? 



WILLIAM V. CAVANAGH, ASSO- 
CIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF 
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. 
Love's Labor Lost. 




71 




p. 

h 



\ 





ALVIN J. B. TILLMAN, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTET- 
RICS AND GYNECOLOGY. Feeling ill? 



LANDRUM B. SHETTLES, ASSIST- 
ANT PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OB- 
STETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. What 
are little boys made of? 



W. DUANE TODD, INSTRUCTOR 
ON OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOL- 
OGY. She thought it was the meno- 
pause. 




Describe the syphlitic placenta? 




HAROLD M. TOVELL, AS- 
SISTANT CLINICAL PRO- 
FESSOR OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY. It 
wasn't a fibroid. 




ROBERT E. HALL, ASSOCIATE CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY. There is no 
safe way. 



Another stimulating precept The C. O. says turn in your blades, Lem- 

meeting. lich. But I thought there were 20 of you. 




72 



7 



%t 




i 



8 



■ 



KENT ELLIS, ASSISTANT PROFES- 
SOR OF RADIOLOGY. Barium. Tastes 
good, and good for you. 



M. 



WILLIAM B. SEAMAN, PROFESSOR 
OF RADIOLOGY. These pictures are 
worse than ours. 




RALPH SCHLAEGER, ASSOCIATE IN 
RADIOLOGY. Now wiggle your toes. 



Specialty time was a time for sleep, reading, dissipation and lechery, 
some encouraged by the departments. Squinting down gagging throats, 
pretending to see things in the ear, and looking profound at their almost 
believable histories. Then an hour later expertising on dermatidites; 
allergic, contact, venemous, idiopathic, iatrogenic, LMDermatologenic. And 
fondly we remember Lord Nelson, of TPI not Trafalgar fame, as he issued 
his cry in the Battle of Staten Straits— "Go back, knock two times, and ask 
for Lues." 



JULES WALTNER, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL OTOLARYNGO- 
LOGY. Three nails and a 
medical student, please. 





MILOS BASEK, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
OTOLARYNGOLOGY and EDMUND J. FOWLER JR., 
PROFESSOR OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY. How do you ex- 
pect me to lecture about such rotten material. 



73 



ROBERT M. HUI, ASSIST- 
ANT CLINICAL PROFES- 
SOR OF OTOLARYNGOLO- 
GY. We just struck oil. 





L. SCHWEICH, ASSOCIATE IN DER- 
MATOLOGY. Look, don't touch . . . 



Left: F. P. LOWENFISH, ASSISTANT 
CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF DERMA- 
TOLOGY. What do you mean by con- 
tact dermatitis? 

Right: J. LOWRY MILLER, ASSOCI- 
ATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF DER- 
MATOLOGY. Gentlemen, I have two 
basal cells, three athlete's foots, and 
one third year diagnosis. 





CARL T. NELSON, PROFESSOR OF CHARLES F. POST, ASSOCIATE IN 

DERMATOLOGY, touch, don't look DERMATOLOGY, and never take a 

. . . history. 



And lastly, fhat paper in Urology you copied from someone else. A 
masterpiece of padding, irrelevancy and incredulity. Quite fitting for the 
course for which it was written. 



Right: JOHN K. LATTIMER, PRO- 
FESSOR OF UROLOGY. Where did 
this NG tube come from? 
Below: Me next! 






Above: HANS H. ZINSSER, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
UROLOGY. Gadgetry's my game. 
Below: I know you guys will be in- 
terested in this. 



Our chronicle is compleat, hardly worthy of or equal to our prodigious 

class, but adding another dimension. If there are any professors we failed 

to offend, we offer sympathy but no regrets. Lest we forget, these were 

our golden years. 

John A. Talbott 



74 




The Robber Baron 



Horseface Harry ties on 
the bag. 



Private Practice 



What CPC? 





F" , T'?I^P| 



Hansel 





Gretel 



Home Sweet Home 



The International Set (Sterling! 




75 




Pediatrics 



One more Talbott robs the 

craddle 



Local Tammanyites assemble 



Northwest Passage 



Mrs. Deuel, alas. 



That's what you think. Tomorrow we die. 



JL3 




Chuck says Urology's fun. 



The Blockhouse 



Ah yes, they're still here. 



While the city slept. 




Ads and 



Adages 



77 



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78 



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81 



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82 



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Final Proof (A) February 28, 1961 



84 



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Medical Center Pharmacy 

Jacob Kaplan, Ph. G. WA 3-1258 

4013 BROADWAY 
Bet. 168th and 169th Sts. New York City 

Specialists in Prescription Compouding 


The New England Journal is second 
only to the Wall Street Journal 


WA 3-9844 Free Delivery 

CENTER PIZZA 

HOME COOKING — EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Tote Home a Delicious Pie 
1152 ST. NICHOLAS AVE. 


BEST WISHES 

TO 

THE GRADUATING CLASS, 1961 

THOMAS CRIMMINS CONTRACTING CO. 

Founded 1848 

Now working 

on the foundations for the 

new Service Building 



85 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



BARD HALL 



86 



SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 

Specialist in 
INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 

233 Broadway, New York 7, N. Y. 
BEekman 3-6620 


INTERSTATE TELEVISION 

Incorporated 

D. Stewart 

Expert Servicing 
TELEVISION - RADIO - RECORD PLAYERS 

600 West 171st Street New York 32, N. Y. 
WAdsworth 7-8640 


The only good urologist 

is a rich urologist. 

The only good psychiatrist 

is a mad psychiatrist. 

The only good surgeon 

is a dumb surgeon. 

The only good dermatologist 

is a dead dermatologist. 


SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 Broadway cor. 168th Street 


WA 3-2424 "Say It With Flowers" 

MEDICAL CENTER 
FLOWER SHOP 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

Artistic Decorations For All Occasions 
The Flower Shop Nearest Medical Center 

"WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS" 

4003 Broadway at 168th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 


SeM WUheA 
gohrt A. £atet 

ESTATE PLANNING 

CI 5-2300 

666 5th Avenue 

N. Y. 19, N. Y. 


Haircut or a Manicure 

DOMINGO CUEVAS 
BARBER SHOP 

Six Experts 

4005 Broadway nr. 169th St. 
WAdsworth 8-4910 

The Barber Shop Nearest 
The Medical Center 



87 




and c&lle$e4- everytv&exe. 



Established 1919 



H. G. Roebuck & Son, Inc. 



PRINTERS • LITHOGRAPHERS 



2140 Aisquith Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

HOpkins 7-6700 



PROUD PRODUCERS OF YOUR ANNUAL 



SLOAN'S SUPERMARKETS 

170th Street and Broadway 

Open Until 9 P.M. Every Night 
For Your Shopping Convenience 

Call WAshington Heights 7-3884 

D. APPEL 

EXPERT TAILOR, CLEANERS and DYERS 

230 FT. WASHINGTON AVENUE 
Bet. 1 69th and 1 70th Sts. 

Thirteen hours labor for 

Delivery in the corridor. 



BROADWAY at 165th ST. NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

WA 3-9110, 3-9230 

Center Restaurant and Bar 

ITALIAN -AMERICAN CUISINE 
Our Pizzas Are "Tops in the Heights" 



VIC GREENBAUM, INC. 

HABERDASHER 

Manhattan Shirts 

Professional Discount 

4009 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY 

WA 3-4220 



MEDICAL CENTER 
NURSERY SCHOOL 

626 WEST 165th STREET 
near Ft. Washington Ave. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTESTANTS IN THE FINALS 
OF THE ESSAY COMPETITION OF THE NEW YORK 
SECTION OF THE AMERICAN UROLOGICAL ASSN. 
All speakers are to wear a dark suit, a very conservative 
necktie and a white shirt. They are to have a haircut 
within three or four days of the time of their speech. 
Their shoes are to be shined. . . . 

J.K.L. 



WA 3-9216-9217 

LUIGI'S 
RESTAURANT & BAR 

Washington Heights Leading Italian Restaurant 
1148 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

Bet. 167th and 168th Streets 



ARMORY 
BAR and GRILL 



Discontent breeds medical students. 
Medical students breed easily. 



Tel. LOrain 8-1230 



Nick Tsakiridis 



OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

Bet. 1 69th and 1 70th Sts. 
4021 BROADWAY NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



REME RESTAURANT 

FOOD OF DISTINCTION 

4021 BROADWAY cor. 169th ST. 
NEW YORK CITY 

Air Conditioned 



89 




Do You Recognize 



Andrews, G. C, Domonkos, A. N., and Silva, A., 
"Griseofulvin in Dermatomycoses" 

Atchley, D. W., 

"The Clinical Clerkship in Medicine" 

Billo, 0. E., and Wolff, J. A., 
"Thrombocytopenic Pupura 
Due to Cat-Scratch Disease" 

Crikelair, G. F., 

"Surgical Approach to Facial Scarring" 

Doshay, L. J., 
"Parkinson's Disease" 

Doshay, L. J., 

"The Psychotherapy of Paralysis Agitans" 



Fink, B. R., Hans, E. C, Holaday, D. A., and Njai., S. H, 
"Monitoring of Ventilation by Integrated 
Diaphagmatic Electromyogram" 

Laragh, J. H., Laragh, J. H., 

"Hypotensive Agents and Pressor Substances" "The Role of Aldosterone in Man" 



Flood, C. A., 

"Clinical Features in the Management of 

Esophageal Histal Hernia" 



You should ! Why? Because they represent 
original contributions to the Journal of the 
A.M. A. by persons associated with the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University. 

If you had been a regular subscriber to the 
Journal of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, you could have read these articles and 
many others. Each week, JAMA serves as 
a leading source of medical facts and in- 
formation for thousands of physicians, resi- 
dents, interns and students. 



Medical students find JAMA one of the 
best means of enhancing their medical 
knowledge. Original articles— contributions 
of important medical significance— and 
editorials on important developments in 
the world of medicine are found in every 
issue. Departmental features— "Washing- 
ton News", "Medical News", "Foreign 
Mail", "Letters to the Journal", "Book 
Reviews", "Questions and Answers", 
"References and Reviews" and many 
others— keep readers abreast of current 
happenings in all areas of medicine. 




MEDICAL NEWS 



90 



These Authors and Articles? 



Lattimer, J. K., Milicos, M. M., and Uson, A. C, 
"Nephroblastoma (Wilm's Tumor)" 



Moya, F., and James, L. S., 
"Medical Hypnosis for Obstetrics" 



Moya, F., Apgar, V., James, J. S., and Berrien, C, 
"Hydramnios and Congenital Anomalies" 



Neer, C. S. II, 
"Nonunion of the Clavicle" 



Perera, G. A., 

"Antihypertensive Drug Versus Symptomatic 

Treatment in Primary Hypertension" 




Pool, J. L., 

"Circulation of the Brain" 

Seneca, H., Zinseer, H. H., and Lattimer, J. K., 
"Relation of Drug Resistance to Enzyme 
Activity Among Coliform Bacteria" 



Saiger, G. L., 

"Errors of Medical Studies" 

di Sant'Agnese, P. A., 

"Salt Depletion in Cold Weather in 

Infants with Cystic Febrosis of the Pancreas" 



As a special aid to medical students, new, 
lower subscription prices are in effect for 
the Journal of the A.M.A. 

You may have your choice of a special 
eight-month school-year subscription 
(October through May) for only $5.00—35 
weekly issues— for only fourteen cents a 
week. 

Or, take advantage of the new, lower one- 
year Student-Intern-Resident rate of $7.50 
— formerly $9.00. This will bring you a 
copy of JAMA each week during the year. 



Either way, there is a substantial saving 
over the regular yearly subscription price 
of $15.00. 

These special rates are designed to aid 
medical students receive maximum benefits 
at minimum costs by subscribing to the 
Journal of the A.M.A. Take advantage of 
these rates now! Send your order to the 
American Medical Association, Circulation 
and Records Department, 535 N. Dearborn 
St., Chicago 10, Illinois. Identify yourself 
as a medical student and include your re- 
mittance to save extra handling. 

You'll be glad you did! 



Government Services 




91 



WA 8-9845 

GOLDEN AGE RESTAURANT 

Specializing in Seafood, Steaks and Chops 

KZM Foods Inc. 

4019 Broadway cor. 169th St. New York, N. Y. 


= 

The stethescope's a wonderous thing, 
It makes the bronchi hum and sing. 
It brings out murmurs, snaps, and rubs, 
And turns drab dups to luscious lubs. 
Systolic murmurs become zonking, 
And lungs of asthma can't help honking. 
Why then, if it's a wonderous thing, 
Sounds my chest bad, on listening? 


WAdsworth 7-5700 Lie. 532 

M. CITARELLA, INC. 

WINES and LIQUORS 
Visit Our Wine Cellar 

3915 Broadway nr. 164th Street- 
New York 32, N. Y. 


JOHN W. BUNGER 

GROCER 

; FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
1 226 Ft. Washington Avenue 

Corner 169th St. 


THE JUBILEE CLEANERS 

For The Finest in Cleaning and Tailoring 
Same Day Service at No Extra Charge 
Business Shirts Beautifully Laundered 

3921 Broadway cor. 164th St. N. Y. C. 


HEIGHTS 
CAMERA CENTER 

The Leading Brands in Photographic 
Equipment and Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

The Finest Quality in Photo Finishing 
Done on Premises 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

Between 171st and 172nd Streets 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. | 
WA 3-3698 


Blood is the best substitute 
we have for Dextran. 


WASHING — SIMON IZING 
TIRES — BATTERIES — LUBRICATION 

WEST 166th ST. GARAGE 

Modern Fireproof Garage (Cap. 325 Cars) 
Reliable — Fully Insured — Licensed 

505 West 166th Street New York City 
WAdsworth 3-9389 LO 8-8038 



92 



Compliments 



of 



CHEMICAL BANK 



NEW YORK TRUST 



93 



L^omplimentd 
of tne 



P&S 

ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 



To each member of the Class of 1961 
the P&S Alumni Association extends 
its best wishes for a happy and suc- 
cessful career. 



Harry W. Wechsler P & S '21, President 



Compliments of 

U.S. VITAMIN & PHARMACEUTICAL 



Manufacturers of 

DBI 

C.V.P. 

ARLIDIN 

PANTHODERM 

PANTHO-F 

CO-SALT 

VI-SYNERAL 

and other pharmaceutical products 



95 




Dedicated to the discovery 

and development of better medicines 

for better health-since 1841. 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 

120 years of service to the health professions 



96 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

This book is due on the date indicated below, or at the 
expiration of a definite period after the date of borrowing, as 
provided by the library rules or by special arrangement with 
the Librarian in charge. 


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Yearbook. 



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